All about gelatin

All about gelatin

It is very common to hear doubts about the correct use of gelatine, so in this post I explain several tips to keep your desserts at the right spot!

  • As for using room temperature water, it shouldn’t be a problem if you live in Alaska, however if you live in Africa it can get a little more complicated 😉
  • The best way to dissolve gelatine – no matter if it is in foil or powder – is in ice waterbecause if you use hot water, the gelatin’s outer granules will swell very fast, preventing water from penetrating into the center of the granule. In the case of gelatin sheet it is even worse, as it will dissolve and you will lose most or almost all of the gelatin content in the water.
  • Never boil gelatin or the desserts made with it, as it remains with its gelatinization powers only until 60˚C, after that it loses its effectiveness. Gelatine maintains its properties in the best way when heated to 35˚C.
  • Sweets and desserts made with gelatin should rest for at least 8 hours in the refrigerator, but the ideal would be for 24 hours, because after that it will not harden any more.
  • Substituting gelatin powder for gelatin sheet, and vice versa, can be very controversial, but for me what has worked is: for every 6 grams of gelatin in foil I add 1 gram for gelatin in powder, that is, 6 grams of gelatin in sheet = 7 grams of gelatin in powder.

All about gelatin

  • I always prefer to use gelatin foil rather than gelatin powder, because for me gelatin foil makes dessert more firm, it leaves no residual taste and there is no possibility that some granules will not dissolve well. But it may just be a crazy thing in my head!
  • Leaf gelatine is best if softened in a large amount of cold water. Then the excess must be squeezed and drained out. Cold water is necessary to avoid interfering with the gelatine flowering phase. If you dip more than one gelatin sheet together, be sure to separate them into the water, as if they stick together they will not absorb the water properly. Let it soak until the leaves expand and wrinkle, this takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes, depending on the quantity. The more leaves you dip, the longer it will take, but don’t leave the gelatin in the water for much longer than that, as it can start to break and you won’t be able to use it in the correct amounts if they disintegrate. After that moment, they must be drained, heated to 35˚C and immediately added to the liquid that will be used in the preparation. After that it will be completely ready when it reaches 4˚C.
  • However, when using powdered gelatin, you must soften the gelatin in exactly the right amount of water to be used in the recipe. If you use too much water, you will reduce the strength of the gelatin.

All about gelatin

  • Some fruits such as pineapple, kiwi, papaya and melon have an enzyme, the bromelain, which can prevent gelatin from structuring itself. The same enzyme is also found in ginger. But you can prevent this by heating the fruits before using them, which will destroy the enzyme. Salt can also reduce the strength of gelatin and cause the structure to collapse, but it will all depend on the amount of gelatin being used. Milk and dairy products, on the other hand, can reinforce the gelatinization process and better structure gelatin, as do sugars, except for fructose.
  • Acidic products, such as vinegar, fruit juice and wines with a pH below 4, end up producing a weaker gelatin, but this can be reversed by using 1/3 more gelatin in the original recipe without these products.
  • Putting gelatine in the diet can make it non-Kosher, Halal, or unsuitable for those on vegetarian diets, as most gelatines are derived from beef or pork, which is not always mentioned in the package. In France, this is seen when gelatine is derived from pork.

The ideal amount of water to be used in a gelatin preparation should follow the following formulas:
– For powdered gelatin, multiply the quantity in grams of the gelatin by 5 and the result will be the amount of water needed in the manufacture of the product. That is, if the recipe calls for using 10 grams of powdered gelatin, you must multiply 10 by 5, which will be equal to 50. 50 grams must be the amount of water you will add to the powdered gelatin.
– For sheet gelatine, you must multiply the amount required in the recipe by 6. However, unlike powdered gelatine, you will not add 60 grams of water to gelatine. You should place the gelatin sheets in a large bowl filled with cold water and weigh the gelatin in another bowl as it hydrates. At the end of the process, if you had 10 grams of gelatin, it should now weigh 60 grams.
[youtube]1mMSLKmPxbk[/youtube]Sources:
http://www.davidlebovitz.com/2009/04/how-to-use-gelatin/
http://www.britishlarder.co.uk/how-to-use-gelatine/#axzz1u7RLJ68k
http://chefdrm.tumblr.com/
And own experiences !!

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