Bean-to-bar: the new way to make (and eat) chocolate

Bean-to-bar: the new way to make (and eat) chocolate

bean-to-bar-chocolate-la-naya-chocolate-packagingoftheworld-ickfd
When we think of chocolate, usually what come to mind are those best known brands, right? Like Nestlé, Garoto, Lindt, Hershey’s… But, for some years now, the chocolate market has been taking a very different approach.
Although artisanal chocolate is not new, around 2005, in the United States, a movement of artisans committed to quality and love began to be born. Willing to make a sophisticated product with natural ingredients, small manufacturers were increasingly entering the game and stealing a large slice of the cocoa market.
Gradually, more and more artisans around the world began to copy this idea and the new trend was called “bean-to-bar” (which in Portuguese means, “from almond to bar”).
bean-to-bar-chocolate-lovingearth-ickfdSource: Loving Earth – top photo: Packaging of the world
The idea of ​​these manufacturers is to buy cocoa beans directly from producers who work with pesticide-free production, pay a fair price for cocoa and offer a product as natural as possible to the final consumer.
To do this, these companies typically opt for grains of unique origin and finer ingredients and produce small batches (from 2 to 35 kg) of chocolate at a time. In general, in addition to being willing to give up the exorbitant profit and focus on quality and freshness, small traders prioritize local sales.
bean-to-bar-chocolate-wilkischocolate-ickfdSource: Wilkischocolate
And it’s not just fun in this business! In general, entrepreneurs literally get their hands dirty: they carefully separate and then grind the almonds, as well as invent new recipes and interact with the end consumer. Everything is very natural and interactive… Everything is very “cute”!
In addition, these brands are always innovating, mixing flavors and playing with the percentages of cocoa, that’s why the trend attracts so many “foodies” and curious people.
chocolate-bean-to-bar-nyt-ickfdSource: New York Times
Bean-to-bar chocolate bars are usually much more expensive than processed chocolates, but you pay for the certainty that you are consuming a sustainable chocolate, free of additives, that the cocoa producer has been properly paid and the production did not involve child labor . In addition, by buying this type of chocolate, you help small businesses.
Many of these companies also attract consumers by using organic and healthy ingredients, such as, for example, replacing refined sugar with alternative sweeteners.
Even the packaging is very well designed, always seeking to work with sustainable materials. Superfopas and rustic! It makes you want to buy all the flavors!
chocolate-bean-to-bar-npr-ickfdchocolate-bean-to-bar-chocolabo-ickfdSources: Nor – Chocolabo
In Brazil, there are some manufacturers of chocolate bean-to-bar. Among them we can cite AMMA, Chokolah, Luisa Abram and the Pratigi line from Chocolat du Jour. Typically, these companies sell their products in their own stores or specialized markets.
amma-chocolate-bean-to-bar-ickfdSource: Amma
I love bean-to-bar chocolate! I feel that each bar has a different flavor, begging to be discovered by my taste … Hehehe! Have you proved it?
* In Venezuela, I visited a very cool “bean-to-bar” project called “Cacao de Origen”. I even wrote a post on my blog about this project. Check there!

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