Beaujolais Nouveau is here!

Beaujolais Nouveau is here!

Someone saw signs on the windows of restaurants around Brazil saying something like “Le Beaujolais Nouveau est arrivé!” or in good Portuguese, did Beaujolais Nouveau arrive?
At least in São Paulo, this sign has become quite common in recent years. Beaujolais Nouveau has become a commercial fever in Brazil and has been disputed by tapas.
But, what is this Beaujolais Nouveau? THE Beaujolais is a region that is south of Burgundy in France and produces wines with a grape called Gamay. The Gamay grape is a very fresh, light and fruity grape and generally does not give wines of great complexity and which are also not suitable for storage. In other words, a good part of Beaujolais are wines to be consumed when young. There are some wines from the Beaujolais region called Fleurie, Brouilly and Moulin a Vent which are still superior wines and, depending on the producer, they can be wines of aging. But this is not the case with Beaujolais Nouveau. Beaujolais Nouveau is actually a wine that symbolizes the end of France’s grape harvests, fermented for just a few weeks before being bottled and offered for sale. Roughly speaking, this means that the wine did not have time to develop properly, it will not have great aromatic and taste complexity and, finally, it will have no storage potential. In short, Beaujolais Nouveau is a simple wine, with moderate acidity, light on the palate, with few tannins and a very typical aroma of… bananas!
The launch of this wine is always on the third Thursday of November and is marked by celebrations in the region. In fact, the Beaujolais Nouveau celebrations became so famous that wine is now exported all over the world and in great demand. Everyone wants to be part of the French festivities!
Now, in my opinion, the fame of this wine is quite doubtful. I already commented that this is a simple wine, without many frills, and here in France I saw it being published on posters by the subway with prices starting at 3 euros. Well, 3 euros today is not even R $ 10.00. A wine of 3 euros here in France is a very popular wine but it is worth remembering that for the French every day is a day to drink wine, but wines of “day by day”. In other words, yes, many popular wines are consumed and Beaujolais Nouveau is a “day to day” wine. With or without an economic crisis, I still haven’t seen many French people invest large sums in wines to be consumed every day. They do buy special wines but, like the rest of the world, they consume them on special dates. The big difference is that here in France there is a large amount of excellent quality wines at low prices.
Some say that Beaujolais Nouveau is a “piquette”. A “vinpiquette” is actually a light, young and low-quality wine. Well, I said that this wine is exported and celebrated by everyone and in Brazil it couldn’t be different. Even more curious is the great interest of consumers in this wine, causing importers’ stocks to run out even before the wine reaches the country. And look, given the amount of taxes placed on luxury products, this wine will never have a price compatible with its quality. I did a brief search on the internet and the prices this year were between R $ 75.00 and R $ 100.00! As the production and sale of this wine is limited, the price ends up rising even more!
In my time as a salesperson every year I observed the stress of logistics, salespeople and customers around this wine. Now, my Brazilian people, I know that the economy of our country is running at an hourly rate, that people are employed and have access to endless credits, but do you swear it is worth slapping for a “piquette” wine?
I’m not saying here that Beaujolais Nouveau is not worth drinking, as I know a lot of people who love this wine. And again, taste is taste. But I really think it is time for Brazilians to review their concepts, in relation to consumer icons …

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