Everything You Need to Know About Icing Cream (Crème Patissière)

Everything You Need to Know About Icing Cream (Crème Patissière)

One of the most classic confectionery preparations is, without a doubt, the Confectioner Cream. Especially because, it is the basis for several sweets, such as cake fillings, bombs, carolines or to build layers in very creamy pavés.
As difficult as it may seem, making a delicious crème patissière is not at all complicated. Here, the saying “practice makes perfect” applies! The more you train, the better your cream will look. And never forget: confectionery is precision.
As tips are always valuable for the result to be even better, we will share some secrets and details that will make all the difference for your cream to be perfect.

Ingredients

Confectioner Cream
First of all, it is essential to know what are the basic ingredients of the icing cream. The most classic recipe is prepared with milk, gems, sugar and maize starch. And, for a more complex flavor, vanilla bean is super welcome! In addition, versions with chocolate, coffee and tea, for example, are very common. After all, almost all the preparation of the confectionery is recreated.
The amount of each ingredient varies depending on the recipe, so try several and see which one you prefer! In some cases, the starch is replaced by flour, others take the whole egg instead of just the yolk, and so on … The changes obviously also interfere with the flavor and texture, so the secret here is to find the one that most appeals your taste buds.

The importance of gems

Confectioner Cream
Don’t even think about the possibility of replacing the yolks with any other ingredient, combined? The yolk is the ingredient responsible for the gelation of the cream, making it firm and, at the same time, creamy and velvety.
So that the egg yolks do not turn into a large omelet in the middle of the milk, tempering is indispensable. Put some of the liquid in the jar with the egg yolks and sugar and stir well until it forms a more homogeneous cream. Only after this step will you add the egg yolks in the pan with the milk.

Pay attention to processes

Confectioner Cream
The tempering stage takes us to this topic: the importance of following all processes! Mixing egg yolks with sugar and starch in a separate pot, for example, is that kind of step that cannot be skipped. Also, don’t forget to add some hot milk to this mixture, as we talked about above.
Following this order and stirring everything over and over, your cream is unlikely to have lumps or a more lumpy texture. Oh, and watch out for the temperature of the milk. The preparation may end up cutting if the milk is extremely hot.

Cooking time

Confectioner Cream
The velvety texture of the crème patissière is one of its main characteristics. In other words, getting the preparation point right is essential. And how do we know when the cream is ready? It’s simple: as soon as the first bubble comes out, stir for a minute (always without stopping). If you are preparing a recipe with more than 1 liter of milk, it is worth adding another minute of cooking.
Another way to know if the cream is ready is by napé stitch. Basically, you just need to see if the cream perfectly covers the back of a spoon. Then, run your finger across the middle of the surface. If a “path” is formed and the edges of the cream do not move, it is because it is already ready.

Common mistakes

Confectioner Cream
After we have told you everything you should do, the time has come to tell you what cannot happen at all! Letting the cream overcook, for example, will cause it to become lumpy. But if you leave the preparation for less than necessary, the cream will most likely have a residual flavor of cornstarch or flour.
Another very common problem is cooking the icing cream over a very high heat. The correct thing is to use the medium heat until it boils and, after the first bubble, lower it to the lowest heat. In the case of lumps, in addition to the high temperature, another cause for this problem is to mix the starch a little with the yolk or excess starch.
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If anyone has any questions, leave them in the comments! And, to put all this knowledge into practice, make this delicious cake / pie number 😉

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