Fake foods

Fake foods

Anyone who appreciates this pleasure in life that is eating will agree that it would be good to know exactly what is written on the labels of each product we buy on the market. But “there is more between heaven and earth than our vain philosophy supposes”, and the mystery of false foods is one of them. Based on the article in Revista Galileu, I am going to tell you some macabre little secrets and that you may have heard of in one conversation or another, about foods that are not what they seem to be.
There is still time to click on the back of the page and access delicious recipes (made with real food!), So I already warn you. If you want to continue reading, then get ready for some reality shocks. I’m going to start with the farce that is, it can be tricky and super known, but it frustrated me a lot: the popcorn butter. That’s right, that combination of cozy aromas and flavors that surrounds us as soon as we arrive at the cinema.
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Photo: Cemedmg
That butter melted in popcorn is FALSE! It is just soy oil with flavoring. I know that too much butter is bad, especially in popcorn. I know that, but every now and then I eat… Now, soy oil? With flavoring? You can’t forget the beta carotene dye, used to give a realistic and striking tone. It makes sense, right. Butter is more expensive and always has an inexpensive way to profit from the ingenuity of the consumer.
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Photo: Portal Bem Bem
Last week there was a complete post about the controversy about fractionated chocolate and such. The point here is that to be called chocolate, the product must have at least 25% cocoa. The bomb comes now: according to Marco Lessa, a cocoa producer and president of the Ilhéus Tourism Association, in Bahia, one in THREE chocolates sold in Brazil is fake. And the hole is much lower. Here is the complete article (worth reading) on ​​UOL’s website.
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Photo: Day to Day Forever
Wholemeal bread, the real thing, has 3 to 5 grams of fiber in every 50g of bread. The problem is that Anvisa has not established a minimum percentage for products on the market to be called integrals. That is, sometimes that cookie that looked innocent and healthy. It can be a trick. I was talking to Dani and Bombom about it, and when Bombom said that industrialized cereal bars are not good … Another frustration.
Whole grains are those that do not go through the refinement process and keep all the “clothes”, that is: they can lower cholesterol levels and control blood insulin levels.
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Photo: Vegetables
Popular in Japanese cuisine, Kani Kama is theoretically processed crab meat. In practice, that compact pink rectangle is made with surimi, a mixture of countless types of fish, wheat starch, egg white, sugar, seaweed extract, crab and lobster flavorings, salt, rice wine and monosodium glutamate. The latter is a salt present in all animal and vegetable proteins, used by the food industry to enhance the taste of food. The use of monosodium glutamate can cause diseases such as Alzheimer’s and cancer. So, is there a sushi with kani?
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Photo: Static
Finally, cherry cake time! Oh no, wait. That crunchy red little thing, full of syrup and that accompanies cakes and pies is far from cherry. My father already said that and I passed it on to my friends before. Now I’m rectifying it: people, it’s chayote. Dipped in a pile of sugar and artificial coloring.
And it has nothing to do with the real fruit, which is delicious, right? But calm down, those in syrup with the stem are really cherries, as far as I know. It was just what they needed to put a sprig of chayote in a ball … Where it was seen.

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