Flaming

Flaming

This is a technique widely used in gastronomy. In both savory dishes and desserts, the buckling is, say, the icing on the cake. The special touch that adds much more flavor, texture and aroma to the dish through “passing through the flame” (definition of the French term flamber).
In order to flambe some food, you must hand-pick an alcoholic drink. After all, it is her taste that will be incorporated into the food. Ah, the alcohol content must be 40%. Cognac is the most widely used, but rum, whiskey, liquor and even cachaça also come out.
This is a short glossary of the most used drinks for flaming sweets:
(source: Gazeta do Povo)
Kirsch – Distillate with digestive effect made from cherry. Very used in drinks.
Calvados – Fine distillate, of French origin, made from apples.
Eau-de-vie – Wine distillates, such as cognac, made from pears.
Cointreau – French liqueur of orange and aromatic herb, widely used as a digestive and aperitif.
Grand Marnier – Brandy oranges liqueur. It can be red, which is stronger, or sweeter. It is used as an aperitif and is part of the ingredients of various drinks.
To flambe what you want, the frying pan is the ideal instrument, because as it has the lowest edges, it is easier for the alcohol to ignite. It takes a lot of care and attention, so don’t do five things at the same time, ok?
The pan should be very hot. Add some of the drink in the corner opposite you, so you don’t get burned. Then, tilt the edge so that the fire touches the alcohol and the food is on fire! But after that, you can’t add more drinks, it’s very dangerous. Wait for the fire to go out. The result is a much more tasty and special dish.
flambé
A little bit of history: they say the technique was born out of carelessness, like many discoveries in cooking. At the end of the 19th century, chef Henri Charpentier was preparing crepe Suzette to Prince of Wales Edward VII, when he got distracted and the fire went up in the pan. As the candy was soaked in brandy … It happened. At least the accident paid off well, right?

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