Interview with Patrícia Homsi from Cásper Líbero

Interview with Patrícia Homsi from Cásper Líbero

PH – How did the idea of ​​starting the blog come about? From the name, to the initial concept?
DN – The ICKFD website emerged from the moment I started making confectionery and the doubts I had in class were greater than my certainties and greater than the responses of the teachers. I was always very questioning and always wanted to know more about the reason for the process of each recipe and not so much the purely pragmatic and decorating part. And that kind of answer, or I was only able to find it in books or sometimes on some websites and blogs outside Brazil. That’s how ICKFD came about, more so that someone could answer my questions instead of me answering people. In the end, the opposite happened, but I end up learning a lot from the questions of others, because when I don’t know the answer I have to go researching and I end up learning a lot, and mainly fixing the subject in my head; all of this becomes a process of mutual aid. Well, after that came the videos, because I was testing recipes at home and Paulo (my husband) together with a friend of ours, Rafel, had the idea of ​​filming me and it worked.
PH – Do you maintain the site alone? Who helps with recipes?
DN – Until last week, the site was entirely made by me. Apart from the videos, which are filmed and edited by my friends, everything was done by me: tips, photos, recipes, everything. Now, we started to grow a little bit. Two weeks ago, I have a correspondent in São Paulo, Camila Costa, who whenever an invitation comes to me for some tasting is she who goes in my place; There is Fernanda Flaiban, who lives in New York and whenever she discovers something new there, she makes a post for the website; Talitta Albuquerque, who moved to Paris a week ago and now helps me with the website’s recipes and also posts tips whenever she goes somewhere she likes; and Paulo Cuenca, my husband, who besides being director of the program, now helps me with photos of the recipes; I do food styling and he lights and photographs.
PH – How are the recipes chosen?
DN – It depends a lot, many recipes are asked to be made, others are recipes that I feel like making and others are sent to me and kindly given to be placed on the website.
PH – Do you think it is necessary to have some culinary training to give tips on gastronomy and places to go?
DN – No way, this is the beauty of the implosion of information exclusivity in traditional journalism. Finally, the expert, the authoritative speech and communication focused on the mainstream media fell apart. Nowadays everyone is a potential content producer and this is very rich, because it puts in check the “impartial” point of view of academic journalism, which wants to make believe, according to a code of ethics, which is above personal tastes, political influences , economic and social. In this sense, it is up to the reader / viewer / producer to choose which type of content he wants to dialogue with. This is a debate that is not restricted to gastronomic information, but to all types of content, and in a short time the public finds out if a certain source is reliable or not, but of a parameter of internal coherence of communication, and not of a speech of authority. Especially in the context of food, we have to think that it is a “subject” much more sensorial than rational, in addition to carrying a great cultural and affective load, which determine the taste and affective memory of each one. So I ask: how to say that only experts can talk about food? People have to have more voice each day, not half a dozen opinion makers who want to standardize “good taste” and define what good gastronomy would be.
PH – What do you think is the target audience of ICKFD?
DN – The ICKFD audience is mostly women and girls between 13 and 35 years old. But in general it is an audience of onlookers, who likes (laughs) to travel, eat well (according to the standard of each one), and especially make their own delicacies and have the pleasure of cooking at home.
PH – Why a food blog?
DN – It is not a food blog. It is a confectionery and bakery blog. Simply because the blog is an extension of what I love and do every day and because I really want to talk to people and democratize information.
PH – What do you think of the current gastronomic criticism?
DN – Taking into account both traditional media and the universe of blogs, I believe that it is increasingly diffuse, democratic, pirated, contested, subjective and impossible to know all of its authors.
PH – Do you follow or did you follow any blogger or critic?
DN – I mostly follow blogs from abroad, like Oh Joy or Bakerella. In addition, for me the great parameter of current gastronomic criticism and which I always read are the collaborative criticism sites, such as Qype, TripAdvisor, among others, that work more as evaluators; in these places I usually see a few comments in each rating range to form the big picture, and the comments are so different from one another that it is hard to believe the words of a specialist critic after that. In fact, I don’t even consider what I do food criticism for, they are tips on personal experiences and places I really liked, as well as dealing with recipes, secrets and doubts in the confectionery universe.
PH – What do you think stands out about ICKFD?
DN – Perhaps the spontaneity that I deal with on the subject and the affection that I put there. I always try to improve each area of ​​the site to bring out the best that I can offer to my readers.

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