Prenzlauer, Flea Markets and Radiohead

Prenzlauer, Flea Markets and Radiohead

I arrived in Berlin on Saturday morning, but I was so tired that I barely ate a little something on the street and went home to sleep. I rented a beautiful apartment in Prenzlauer Berg, in the eastern part of Berlin. The apartment has furniture and utensils all from the communist era, practical and beautiful furniture, all with straight lines. All rooms are simple, with few objects, but very interesting. The coolest of all are the hot and cold water clocks strategically located at two points in the house: one next to the kitchen sink and the other on the toilet in the bathroom. I imagine that this is also from the time of communism, where everything was rationed and people could not spend anything, including water, without knowing how much they were spending, but mainly without knowing the limit on how much they could use per month. I found it extremely interesting, as a time of rationing can look so little like the time we live in today, but at the same time, as it would be useful in the days we live in, when we already know that water, as well as everyone else Earth’s natural resources are limited and scarce. In fact, I would love to have these water meters at home these days and I think it would be very useful if everyone did, as I quickly realized that with each flush I used 5 liters of water. I will repeat: 5 LITERS! If you weren’t scared, I think you should review your concepts, because 5 liters for a simple flush is muuuuiittaaaa water.
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After that first reality check, I woke up on Sunday and had already read that flea markets and markets, as well as parks, were a very interesting program for a sunny Sunday. And the day was very beautiful. So I went for a walk around Mauer Park, where there was a fair with handmade objects, as well as second hand things and lots of food stalls. I ate one of those traditional German sausages – Currywurst – and went to enjoy a little the swing that is at the top of the park and listen to the various bands performances that were happening there. Then I stopped by the Arkonaplatz fair, which mostly has second-hand objects from home, such as plates, cutlery and furniture. I found amazing forks and spoons to do the foodstyling of the photos on the website.
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Then I took a bicycle and got off towards Kreuzberg and ended up in a wonderful and huge flea market, the Arena Flea Market, close to the business center. The place is so big and so unreal that only a cinema art director can enjoy all the absurd things that are there. I ended my Sunday at the Radiohead show in Wuhlheide, an arena in the middle of a park. It was the most beautiful show I have ever seen, even with Thom Yorke freezing and talking about it all the time auhauhauhaua; D
Today, I couldn’t get up early because of the show, so I ended up staying in the neighborhood and getting to know some things here. Prenzlauer is a very leafy neighborhood, full of bars, restaurants and shops to see. It is the neighborhood with the most children per inhabitant across Europe, so you see baby strollers and children passing by all the time all the time.
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I went to lunch at Zula, a very cozy and super cheap restaurant that sells a delicious hummus at Husemannstrasse 10. The pita bread came warm and the hummus full of side dishes to mix. The green pepper sauce was just as well. Then I let myself be carried along the small streets around Kollwitzplatz, Kastanienalle and Oderberger, full of stationery stores and home ware, everything I need to live 🙂 Kollwitzplatz is a small square, full of trees and children playing, a delight to spend the afternoon reading a good book.
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I went to the Jewish cemetery at Schonhauser Alle 22 and the Gethsemani church at Stargarder Strass 77, which at the time of the Berlinm division became a meeting place for East German opponents, but which ended up having in its clergy former church dissidents, who were in favor of the communist left and who supported and helped these groups. A symbol of resistance within the church and Berlin. So much so that even today the Prenzlauer is still considered a neighborhood with a different thinking from the rest of the old West Berlin. An example of this is the place I had breakfast on the first day I arrived here, the Morgenrot (on the street next to Berlin’s oldest squat, the Ka86) where you choose how much you will pay (between 5 and 9 euros), and that amount does not depend on how much you ate, but on how much you earn. That is, if you earn more you pay more so that a person who earns less can pay less and eat too. In addition to this more than generous initiative on the part of the owners, breakfast is served in a vegan buffet where you can serve yourself as many times as you like, only the juice you must pay separately. This is a neighborhood where restaurants and cafes have large community tables with large benches facing each other, very different from Parisian cafes and bistros, with their tiny round tables with two chairs facing the street, where people sit and they watch others pass by instead of looking at the person next to them and talking to them. Here in Prenzlauer, you are not in the cafe to see and be seen, you are in the cafe enjoying the moment with the person you have chosen to be there with you, sharing the space and sharing with the other. Finally, I stopped by Victoria met Albert, which has beautiful crockery and clothes and right in front of it is Goldhahn & Sampson, a spice shop, jams and special sweets, as well as several with treats to give as gifts.

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