What is Molecular Gastronomy?

What is Molecular Gastronomy?

Hello everyone, everything good?
I’m Marcella Coser, a blog contributor, and today I came here to chat about the history of science in the kitchen. We use the concepts to explain preparations, so let’s get to know more about this mixture that worked really well!
When you listen molecular gastronomy, what comes to mind? Something complicated and distant from our day-to-day, right? Well let me say something: do you know when you make that airy mousse? Well, my friend, this is also molecular gastronomy.

What is Molecular Gastronomy?

Complete recipe

Molecular gastronomy is the result of studies on food science that unites chemical and physical concepts in order to understand the transformations that can occur in food, in order to enjoy its preparation in the best possible way – whether to make the dish more tasty, different and / or more fun. It is possible to create new methods, techniques and equipment or even to improve what already exists.
The poster boys for this movement are Ferran Adrià, Spanish chef and owner of the El Bulli restaurant (closed in 2011), which revolutionized gastronomy by using chemical and physical techniques and equipment in the kitchen; and Heston Blumenthal, who has 3 Michelin stars and leads the Fat Duck in England.
They are the best known names when we think of molecular cuisine, but this movement started well before both.

What is Molecular Gastronomy?

Photos: The Ascott and Evening Standard

In the mid-nineties, the Culinary Professor, graduated from Le Cordon Bleu, Elizabeth Cawdry Thomas, invited the Hungarian physicist Nicholas Kurti, known for his numerous researches on food science, to organize a Symposium on science and gastronomy in Erice, in Italy.
Nicholas invited two other scientists to compose his team in this endeavor so innovative for the time: Harold McGee, North American writer; and Hervé This, a French chemist who studies scientific explanations for culinary phenomena. Hervé was even responsible for the term “Molecular Gastronomy”.
The Erice Symposium had 6 editions (between 1992 and 2004) and we can say that it was responsible for the spread of the possibility of combining science and cuisine. So much so that Adrià and Blumenthal are the result of the influence of the information shared in Erice. Although Adrià did not honor any edition of the event, his restaurant had a creative peak in 1994, two years after the first edition of the Symposium. Blumenthal, who participated in 2002 and 2004, comments on McGee’s influence in his kitchen.

What is Molecular Gastronomy?

Photo: Symposium newsletter in 1992

There is still a lot to explain about this universe of gastronomy, so I stayed there reflecting that I will come back with more information!
I hope you enjoyed!
Hello,
Cella

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