Wine for everyone!

Wine for everyone!

I started learning about wine at a very young age, at 19, when I entered college. Since then, all the professionals who have crossed my path have been serious, formal and wearing suits and who always left that impression that enjoying a good wine would be something only accessible to intellectuals. Almost ten years later, I can say that this thinking among wine professionals has not changed much. Wine has become an arrogant product for Brazilians, a luxury product for older people, something to impress visitors. I got tired of seeing friends refuse a cup because “Ah, I don’t know how to drink these things …”. But honestly? Do not need…
Since then I always wanted to be able to write about wines in a more youthful, modern and unpretentious way, without worrying about appearances, dogmas and ready-made formulas and when Dani asked me to do a weekly column I thought “this is going to be an excellent opportunity! ” because ICKFD is just a young, modern and unpretentious website! I’m still a long way from being a great expert on the subject but I hope my experiences can help you demystify the wine! For me the most important thing is always, always and always enjoying what you are taking and above all having fun!
Here in France there are many types of wine and for the French it is always time to drink wine! There are wines for celebrations, wines for everyday life, wines for dinners with friends, wines to read a good book and reflect on… Wines for all tastes and budgets!
Last Friday Dani said to me “Choose a wine for us!”. I opened her refrigerator and… “Wow! A Nuits Saint Georges! ”. In Brazil, this type of wine ranges from R $ 200.00 to R $ 800.00! “Can I choose any one?” I asked. “Yes, whatever you want!” When Paulo told me how much the bottle cost here in Paris, I gasped: around 15 euros (about R $ 40.00). There are many factors that make wine cost you a kidney in Brazil but I don’t want to discuss it, it is for another day.
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Here in France there is also a curious “must”: you cannot open a bottle of wine without having a cheese to accompany it. If you drink only a glass of wine, people look at you in the street with that “what’s your problem?” Face. So, let me talk a little bit about this Nuits Saint Georges that we taste and the cheese I chose to accompany.
THE Nuits Saint Georges is a wine made in the Burgundy region of France, and he calls it Nuits Saint Georges because it is produced in the commune of Nuits Saint Georges. This wine is made with only one type of grape, called Pinot Noir (pinô noár… haha!). Pinot Noir is a characteristic grape of Burgundy and this is a region that produces very “elegant” wines. You will see that to describe wines it is common to use adjectives that would be used to describe people! When I say “elegant wine” I mean light wine, which gives you that feeling of being a “velvety” drink, round in the mouth, with perfumes or fine aromas … they are simply delicious!
There are several producers within the Burgundy region, in the municipality of Nuits Saint Georges, who make wines called “Nuits Saint Georges”. What we taste is called Nuits Saint Georges Les Lièvres 2010, produced by Louis Max (and here I’m going to freak out a bit on his “technical” part), which had a light ruby ​​color, was limpid and shiny and his aromas they resembled red berries, like cherries, strawberries and raspberries. The Pinot Noirs de Nuits Saint Georges may be more full-bodied wines, I mean, stronger in the mouth, but the impression this wine gave us was that it was a lighter, fresher, “livelier” wine, something we would choose for a hot summer night, a relaxed meeting with friends. In fact, the seller himself advised to serve this wine at a lower temperature than normal for red wines, somewhere around 15 to 16C. But of course it was a long way from being an ordinary wine, it was a super and excellent wine! The longer the wine spent open in the bottle and in our glasses, the better it got! New aromas were revealed, like a slight vanilla that at first I had not detected! The 2010 harvest, that is, the year the grapes were harvested, was excellent in this region and according to the notes of the producer Louis Max this wine can be kept for more than 5 years which will continue to evolve! Just imagine, drinking such a wine so unpretentiously in Brazil!
Now, about the cheese I chose… here in France, each wine has its own type of cheese and there are also many cheeses for all tastes and pockets! In fact, there are so many types of cheese and I don’t even know half of them! In Brazil the most common is to harmonize wines, from any source, with traditional Italian cheeses such as parmesan, gorgonzola and provolone. From French, they put a maximum of one Brie there. Personally, I think these Italian cheeses are very salty and strong and do not accompany any type of wine. Honestly, the harmonizations I have seen in the past have been horrendous. In fact, I even contracted a certain prejudice of harmonizing red wine with cheese because I always had terrible experiences, the tannins of the wine with the salt of the cheese, that metallic feeling in my mouth … Crosses! So I started to research more about cheese and wine pairings here.
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For Nuits Saint Georges I chose a Camembert. Camembert is a French cheese from the Normandy region, much more delicate than the Italian varieties I mentioned above. It has a white cone on the outside, inside it is very soft and velvety, when young it has a lighter flavor and when older it is much stronger, more complex! Like our wine! The combination worked really well! The important thing about harmonization is the following: never choose a wine stronger than cheese, and vice versa.
I spoke of a very common and accessible type of cheese and wine here in France. Now … how to translate this into the Brazilian reality? A Camembert can be easily found in any Pão de Açúcar market in Brazil. A Nuits Saint Georges however, can be more difficult and expensive. I did a quick search for Google and found no importers that have this exact wine in Brazil. Alternatively, there are Pinot Noir wines made in other parts of the world that are more accessible and easier to find at wine importers or resellers across the country. They can be from Argentina, Chile, South Africa, the USA, among others! Of course, each Pinot Noir carries a characteristic, a little bit of the land on which it was made, but the basic characteristics and essence are very similar.
I hope you enjoyed! Till next week!
Salut!

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